7 Reasons Why People Hate Learning a Foreign Language

Which Foreign Language?

It’s been said on other occasions that a key question people ask when thinking of learning a foreign language is “which foreign language should I try to learn?” Reasons for wanting or needing to learn a foreign language can be almost as many and as varied as the number of people themselves. Family, ancestry, employment, business, education, travel, adventure, romance and other personal concerns all may have their respective roles in the decision to learn and continue learning a foreign language.

With literally thousands of spoken languages in the world besides some of the major ones like English, Spanish, French, Chinese, Arabic, Italian, Japanese and German, obviously there’s no lack of choice. But many learners concede, “I hate trying to learn a foreign language”. Why? Here are the top seven of the most commonly given reasons.

The Seven Most Common Given Reasons

1. No way to practice regularly

“I know that learning a foreign language is a valuable skill, but no one I know speaks it and I have no way to practice”:

2. Long lists of vocabulary to memorize

“We get a 50-word plus long vocabulary list each week in class, and I just can’t keep up with memorizing them”.

3. Illogical Grammar Rules

“The grammar and rules of the foreign language just don’t make any sense to me” complain a number of foreign language learners.

4. Pronunciation Difficulties

“Whenever I try to speak in class everyone laughs at me because I pronounce my words badly, they say”.

5. Bad Foreign Language Teachers

Our foreign language teacher is absolutely horrible. She hardly seems to know the language herself. She really shouldn’t be trying to teach us”.

6. Not Enough Available Resources

“So what do we do with it (a foreign language)? We don’t have any good tapes, videos, songs, movies or games. For me, it seems like a waste.”

7. Foreign Travel is Too Expensive

“Hey, I’d love to visit a foreign country where the language is spoken, but I can’t get a visa”: “Even if I could get a visa, I’d never be able to afford the airfare and hotels.”

Lower Affective Filter

If an English as a foreign language teaching professional is going to do an effective job, these are but a few of the many possible difficulties and objections that may have to be overcome. Only then can the learners’ Affective Filter be lowered or compensated enough for both teacher and learner to get the most out of any language learning efforts.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Language Learning Theories – Condition-Oriented Versus Process-Oriented

Even in learning a new language, there are theories that you need to consider. However, anyone should be aware about it as it affects their way of learning towards studying a new language. There are two main classes of theories in language learning: condition-oriented and process-oriented. Each one emphasizes a different set of factors that play a critical role in the way students can learn best. Here are things that you need to know:

Condition-Oriented Theories

These types of theories focus on the human and physical context in which language acquisition can take place. For example, they answer questions like:

  • What situations does a person need to find himself in to gain the necessary motivation and experience to successfully adopt a new speaking?
  • What characteristics does a good language learner have?
  • Where can someone best acquire a language?

Process-Oriented Theories

In these group of theories, the focus is on learning processes, rather than the conditions that allow them to happen. The idea is that if you can drill down the processes, you can replicate it for as many individuals as possible. This includes concepts such as

  • Habit-formation
  • Hypothesis testing
  • Induction

How does this affect you as a language learner? Well, if you are working towards acquisition, you probably know that you simply can’t depend on one material to facilitate your learning. Even the best language learning software delivers best results when combined with other learning materials. The better-versed you are with theory, the smarter the choices you can make with regards to combining study materials.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Race, Ethnicity, and Participation in Leisure Activities

In “Gender and Leisure” by Susan Shaw and “Ethnicity, Race, and Leisure” by James H. Gramann and Maria T. Allison, the authors describe major ways in which race, ethnicity, and gender influence access and participation in recreation and leisure.

While distinctions of gender are fairly clear in examining the differences between males and females, despite the emergence of a transgendered community, a key difficulty in assessing the impact of race and ethnicity is the way these are defined. That’s because of a growing multicultural society in the U.S., Europe, the U.K. and Canada, which are blurring traditional and ethnic distinctions. But, putting those difficulties aside, this article first discusses the influence of gender and then of race and ethnicity.

As Shaw points out, there are three main ways in which gender has influenced leisure – in terms of activity participation, the gendered nature of leisure constraints, and through gendered outcomes of leisure. The activity approach has shown that a number of activities are stereotyped according to gender, and that there have been differences in “opportunities, experiences, and a time for leisure.” For example, as can be readily observed by anyone who goes to a sports event or visits museums, art galleries, and public lectures, as confirmed by the research, there is a greater participation by men in “sports and physical activities” and by women in “arts and cultural activities.” Then, too, there is a gendered nature to passive leisure, which affects the books, magazines, and film men and women read and view, as well as the hobbies and crafts they participate in. While Shaw notes that little research has examined these differences, these distinctions based on gender can readily be seen in the way marketers target certain types of books, such as those on self-help and relationships to women, and those on sports and business to men. Similarly, films dealing with romance and relationships are targeted to women, and films featuring adventure and action to men.

Also, confirming what has been obvious to the general public, in modern industrialized societies, men have generally had more time to participate in leisure activities, because of what sociologist Arlie Hochschild, who I studied with at U.C. Berkeley, calls the “second shift.” This is because working and married women have generally taken on most of the household and childcare chores at home, so they not only have participated in the paid workforce, but when they come home, they work again. Meanwhile, since they have been less engaged than women in the household, the men get to enjoy additional leisure time, thanks to their women partners.

However, these studies cited by Shaw about women having less leisure time were done in the 1980s and 1990s. In recent years, this distinction between the leisure time for men and women seems to be changing, according to the popular media, in that men are more increasingly involved in splitting up the housework and parenting. This shift is even reflected in the popular media, where the men end up with the kids and learn to enjoy being dads, such as Once Fallen. At the same time, successful women workers are hiring nannies to do the housework and care for their kids and even hiring surrogates to birth them.

As for constraints, these differently affect the opportunities men and women have for leisure. For example, the 1980s and 1990s research cited has shown that women are more constrained than men because of household obligations and family commitments, and because they feel a social obligation due to the “ethic of care,” whereby women may feel an obligation to care for others, so they feel less free to enjoy leisure for themselves. Then, too, women may feel constrained from participating in certain types of activities, because of their fear of violence (such as in boxing and wrestling) or their concern with their body image (such as in swimming), while men may resist participating in activities that seem too feminine and threaten their masculinity (such as ballet).

When it comes to race and ethnicity, it is more complicated to measure either participation or constraints, because of the problems in classifying people by race or ethnicity. These classification problems have occurred because of ethnic and racial diversity and multiculturalism, so the old census racial classifications are breaking down, as pointed out by Gramann and Allison. But those complications aside, much of the research has focused on the different ways that different ethnic and racial groups participate in outdoor recreation, and the results have indicated that Whites tend to participate more in these activities than minority group members. While one reason that many minority group members don’t participate is due to their marginal position in society, whereby they have a lower income and can’t afford to participate, have poor transportation, or fear discrimination, another factor may be cultural differences. Certainly, marginality could be a factor for those with limited incomes, when they have to pay substantial amounts to participate in leisure activities that are mostly participated in by Whites, such as going to dinners in expensive restaurants or paying entry fees for theater and other cultural events.

But another key factor, apart from income and social class is that the members of racial and ethnic groups may have their own “culturally based value system, norms, and leisure socialization patterns,” so they have different interests. An example of this can be seen in areas of ethnic concentration, such as Oakland, where there is a Chinatown in the downtown area, African-American areas in Western and East Oakland, and Latin-American areas in the Fruitvale district. In each area, there are different types of activities that appeal to those in the ethnic groups in the area, such as the dragon boat races of the Chinese, the Kwanza celebration of the African-Americans, and the Day of the Dead celebration of Mexican-Americans. Also, members of the different groups may like reading books and magazines as well as viewing films that feature their own racial or cultural group, whereas Whites are less likely to be interested in these culturally-based types of entertainment. As Gramann and Allison point out, such racially and ethnic based choices of leisure may occur because they are “expressions of culture” or they may be an indication of “selective acculturation”. Then too, these culturally-based forms of leisure could be examples of “ethnic boundary maintenance,” whereby individuals chose to engage in certain activities to highlight their ethnic differences, such as when Native Americans have pow-wows around the country to celebrate their tribal identities.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Motorcycle Repo Auction Get the Best Bike Deal of Your Life

It is a sad story, but everyday there are hundreds of motorcycle riders who default on their motorcycle loan repayments leaving their bike to be sold at repo motorcycle auctions. A visit to a repo motorcycle auction is likely to present cycle purchasers with the opportunity to procure a real bargain.

All of the bikes at auction will have been repossessed due to the original purchaser failing to keep up with monthly repayments. Their loss is your gain, as the finance houses sell off these bikes at a greatly reduced cost, in an attempt to recoup some of the money they originally loaned the owner.

Repo motorcycle auctions feature all types of bikes, from used powersports cycles to exotic ATV vehicles. All of which are presented for inspection before the auction starts, sometimes several days before hand.

Why are bikes seized and repossessed?

Bikes are seized and repossessed for three reasons. The most common reason for a bike to end up at a repo motorcycle auction is because the original owner, who financed the purchase of the cycle through a bank, has failed to keep up with the repayments. Once this happens, the used motorcycle is then seized by a repossession company, and the bank will put it up for sale at a repo motorcycle auction.

The second, much less common reason for a bike to be repossessed is due to the original purchaser supplying false information to the bank at the time of purchase. In this case, the bike is repossessed much more swiftly, and an attempt will be made to negotiate with the retailer to return the bike at a slight loss of price. If this fails, the bike will then be presented at a repo motorcycle auction.

The third reason is a dealership is going out of business and the dealer takes its entire remaining inventory to a repo motorcycle auction to liquidate it one by one. This offers a great opportunity to the buyers at the auction.

Is it safe to buy a motorcycle that has been seized for repossession?

Overall it is quite safe buying a repossessed bike, as they will usually be fairly new, certainly less than three years old, and the paperwork will be in order, due to the fact the finance house will have checked out everything before putting the cycle up for auction.

Of course, there is still the possibility that the motorcycle will be in a bad state of mechanical repair, and it is advised that potential purchasers seek the assistance of somebody with mechanical know how, before making a decision to bid on a particular motorcycle.

Almost every auction house will have all of the bikes to be auctioned available for viewing and inspection before the auction starts, spend this time checking over the bikes that interest you.

Most large motorcycle auctions allow the buyer to pay using a credit card, this is an excellent way of ensuring your financial transaction is not only secure, but comes with built in protection, as most major credit card companies will pursue any dubious auction house on behalf of the buyer if the trade is deemed to be unfair.

Buying a used motorcycle from a repo auction can be a very good way to procure an exceptional bike at a bargain price. Modern day auctions are well run, entirely regulated and safe to deal with. All financial transactions are closely monitored and audited, meaning the shady dealings and back room deals associated with auctions in the past is now behind.

Buyers should still exercise an amount of common sense when purchasing a bike from a repo motorcycle auction, although they are now protected far better than they were even ten years ago.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Nike – Philip Knight’s Success Story – Famous Entrepreneurs

“Play by the rules. But be ferocious.”

Starting The Business

Like Fred Smith and the origins of FedEx, Philip Knight’s first ideas of what would become Nike Inc. came to him while he was at

school. While working on his master’s at Stanford, Knight – an accomplished runner during his undergraduate days at the University

of Oregon – wrote an essay that outlined a plan to overcome the monopoly Adidas had on the running shoe market. He thought the way

to realize this was to employ cheap Japanese labour to make a shoe both better and cheaper.

The plan was put into action shortly after graduating in 1962. Knight went to Japan to meet with the executives of Onitsuka Tiger

Co., a manufacturer of imitation Adidas runners, claiming to be the head of a company called Blue Ribbon Sports (which did not

exist, except in his mind). Knight convinced Tiger to export their shoes to the States though Blue Ribbon and had them send samples

so his associates could inspect them.

Knight paid for the samples with money from his father. He sent a few pairs to Bill Bowerman, Knight’s track coach from his days at

the University of Oregon, who became interested in the venture. Knight and Bowerman became partners and put $500 each into the

purchase of 200 pairs of Tigers. Blue Ribbon Sports was formed, and Knight began going to high school track and field events

selling the shoes from the trunk of his car.

Sales were at $3 million dollars when Knight chose to dissolve the partnership with Tiger in the early 1970s. Blue Ribbon began

producing its own line and began selling its Nike line (named after the Greek goddess of victory) in 1972. These first Nike shoes

were adorned with the now-internationally recognizable swoosh logo – which Knight had commissioned for $35 – and had the

traction-improving “waffle soles”, conceived of by Bowerman while watching his wife using a waffle iron.

Building An Empire

Blue Ribbon’s success (renamed Nike in 1978) throughout the 1970s and into the ’80s can largely be attributed to Knight’s marketing

strategy. He thought it best not to push his Nike shoes though advertising, but rather to let expert athletes endorse his product.

Fortune smiled on Knight as his partner Bill Bowerman became the coach of the American Olympic team and many of the best performers

on the team decided to shod their feet with Nikes. Of course, when the runners performed well, the shoes they wore were

highlighted. Steve Prefontaine, a brash and unconventional American record-holder, became the first spokesperson for Nike shoes.

After the tennis player John McEnroe hurt his ankle, he began wearing a Nike three-quarter-top shoe, and sales of that particular

brand jumped from 10,000 pairs to over 1 million. As Knight had hoped, celebrity athlete’s endorsements brought success to the

company. Knight also capitalized on a jogging craze, and through clever marketing persuaded the consumer that they should only be

wearing the best the best in the world.

The Air Jordans helped the company continue to thrive into the 1980s. In their first year, the shoe made more than $100 million.

Knight realized his initial goal of replacing Adidas as the number the one shoe manufacturer globally in 1986. By then, total sales

had surpassed $1 billion. However, by neglecting the growing interest in aerobics shoes, Nike would have to face a few

difficulties.

Through Problems and Controversy

Sales dropped 18% between 1986 and 1987 as Reebok’s trendy, stylish aerobics shoes came to be in high demand. Knight had to

acknowledge that the technical achievements of the Nike shoe would not satisfy those who placed appearance above performance. The

Nike Air was Knight’s response to Reebok. It revived sales and put Nike back in the number one spot in 1990.

Corporate Monster that it had become, Nike was the object of public outrage in 1990 when stories of teenagers killed for their

Nikes began floating around. It was believed that Nike was promoting their shoes too forcefully.

That same year Jesse Jackson attacked Nike for not having any African-Americans on its board or among its vice-presidents, despite

the fact that its customer base was in large part black. Jackson’s Nike boycott lasted until a black board member was appointed.

There has also been a controversy around whether Knight’s use of Asian factory workers as cheap labour s exploitative.

Through all of the bad press that has been foisted on Nike through these events, Nike shoes have continued to sell well. And in

1993, The Sporting News voted Knight “the most powerful man in sports” though he was neither a player nor a manager. Knight’s

marketing mastery is to be lauded and regarded as a major factor in his impressive successes.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Tips on How to Choose the Right Music Course for a Career in the Music Industry

Selection of the correct music course is crucial. For some, the aim is to get into the music industry as a recording artist at a label or other connected role, others to play in a band or orchestra or become music teachers. The choices are wide and it can be daunting, knowing you will invest a good chunk of your life and money in something where you’re not certain of the outcome. It can feel like a gamble.

Apart from talent (this is a must) getting a job in the music industry requires skill and experience (if you are lucky enough to get a work placement or internship) in addition to a qualification. Budget is also an important factor while choosing a music course. If you play an instrument, some (like brass and wind) can be very expensive. There may well be continuous investment in your instrument as well as the private lessons while studying. If you intent to apply to a top institution which has links to the industry, be aware of the high fees charged.

Generally, most institutions look for a certain standard of performance of vocal and instrumental skills and sometimes composition ability.

Below are some ideas for how to proceed with choosing the best music course:

1. Decide which area of the music industry you are interested in and passionate about.

Is it teaching/education, performance, production / technology or business related? Look at educational and industry directories that provide an overview of different sectors, job specifications etc. Also, view at any advice and guidance pages. If you plan to do a degree, the 2 main ones are a Music BA and BMus. You might find that some universities offer both a BA and a BMus course. While both of them are general music courses, the BA course normally follows a broader range of subjects, including more academic subjects like music history or analysis.

BMus courses, on the other hand,are more practical-oriented. They usually contain more performance and composition elements. You should compare the course details at individual universities for an exact comparison.

2. If applying to a University or College, understand that they want the best candidates as much as you want to study there.

Therefore, do your research. When considering a University/college, consider:

– if you want to stay near your family or move as far away as possible

– big city or small town? What’s the social life like?

– look at how long the course have been established

– what are the entry requirement needed to be accepted?

– do they get visits by people working in the industry?

– are the current students happy with their courses there?

– what was the feedback from previous graduates to the course? How many of them got good jobs when they left?

3. You can help yourself by applying to as many relevant ones as possible.

Be aware that competition for places means many music courses are over-subscribed. Also, there a large number of different music courses available at universities. If you’ve already decided your career path, it is worth considering a specialised music course. If you want to keep your options open, choose a general music course.

4. Visit the institution offering the course and meet the staff and see the facilities.

Understand the nature of the courses you are considering by asking questions, particularly when applying for a specific course. Make sure you ask the following questions:

– How connected to the music industry is the course (e.g. industry guest lectures, work placement opportunities, etc)?

– Do lecturers and staff have industry backgrounds?

– What are the course facilities like (e.g studios, rehearsal rooms, concert hall, teaching areas, libraries, research and development centre)?

– Are there performing opportunities e.g. bands, chamber and full orchestras at special events etc

– What are the opportunities for progression to higher level courses on completion of the qualification/training?

– Do students have freedom to specialise in within the course, e.g. take performance/composition/business as major parts of it? Can students work on their own extended projects under staff direction?

– Does the course teach business skills? anyone entering the music industry must understand the business side. Sales, marketing, people and project management, finance and promotional skills are particularly valuable.

– What is the teaching like? Are the classes small and intimate where everybody has a personal tutor in case something goes wrong?

– What careers have past students gone on to have after completing the course? Is the qualification held in high regard when seen by prospective employers in the music industry?

If possible, it is also worth speaking with a professional musician or music teacher you know because they will be able to identify the possibilities available. Not only this, they will also be able to give you some insight into what to expect when you complete your course and start job hunting.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

3 Common Employment Law Questions Answered

Sometimes employment law can be difficult to comprehend. Here are three common work place situations and their legal ramifications.

1: DISMISSAL DUE TO ILLNESS

There are three potential areas of legal exposure:

· unfair dismissal;

· unlawful termination; and

· discrimination

From time to time an employee will have to leave your employment due to long term health issues. They may decide to resign or you may have to eventually consider dismissing them. It is beneficial to consider as many ways possible to help them back to work – dismissal should be a last resort and could be deemed unfair if not managed properly.

If continued employment is no longer achievable because there are no reasonable adjustments that can be made, it may be fair for you to dismiss them.

The Fair Work Act 2009 states that an employer must not dismiss an employee because the employee is temporarily absent from work due to illness or injury.

The Fair Work Regulation 2009 provides that it is not a “temporary absence” if the employees absence from work extends for more than 3 months, or the total absences of the employee, within a 12 month period, have been more than 3 months. The employer still requires a valid reason to dismiss the employee, even if the employee has been absent on unpaid leave for three months or over.

We suggest you ask the employee to provide medical information on his capacity for work and what support he might need to return to work.

2: EVIDENCE OF ILLNESS

You can insist on employees providing evidence that would satisfy a reasonable person that they are entitled to sick leave, for example, a medical certificate or statutory declaration. That being said there is no specific timeframe as the timeframe required is “as soon as practicable”.

For this reason you should devise a written policy that stipulates that your employees provide such information within a specific timeframe. Your policy should also specify that your employees inform their manager directly of their absence (when possible), or phone their manager within a certain timeframe to explain why they cannot make it to work and when they expect to return.

3: NOTICE OF REDUNDANCY

When dismissing an employee it is necessary to give them notice. The notice commences when the employer tells the employee that they want to end the employment. If you notify them of their redundancy just before leave, the time spent on annual leave will count towards their notice period.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

5 Reasons Doctors Love Dr House

Most doctors I know get a kick out of the television show, “House.” Though we’re all aghast at his bedside manner and cavalier attitude, still there is a certain attraction. Those not in the medical field may wonder how physicians can enjoy watching such a callous fellow.

Here are the five top reasons doctors love Dr. House.

1. Dr. Gregory House says things doctors would like to say themselves, but don’t have the nerve. Most doctors filter what comes out of their mouths. They may think curse words, but seldom say them. We rarely accuse our patients of lying, even when we suspect it. We may think our patients have behaved foolishly, but we keep our thoughts to ourselves. It comes as a catharsis to finally hear a doctor (albeit an imaginary one) say things that cross every doctor’s mind.

2. Dr. House doesn’t do any paperwork. Doctors hate paperwork. It’s not only beyond boring, but sometimes perceived as interfering with patient care. The benefits are usually invisible, uncompensated, and extend the workday (needlessly, he would add).

3. Dr. House walks away from boring cases. Few doctors have this privilege. Physicians take patients as they come, without guarantee of intellectual stimulation. For family physicians, this means seeing high blood pressure patients, day after day after. For dermatologists, it’s acne, psoriasis, and eczema, and for cardiologists it’s heart attack, heart attack, heart attack. Even poor Dr. Wilson sees cancer, cancer, cancer.

4. Dr. House doesn’t worry about getting paid. He’s apparently on a salary, and gets paid the same no matter how few patients he sees or clinic hours he skips. Other doctors get paid by the patient or by the hour and are expected to produce. Most of us would be happy to have an afternoon to spend watching TV or surfing the web, while others are busy doing our work for us.

5. Dr. House doesn’t worry about what anything costs. For a doctor it’s a burden to not only worry that the right tests are ordered, but that they’ll be paid for, either by insurance, the patient, or the government. House simply doesn’t care. He orders every test in the book. In real life it’s not the hospital administrators who are looking over our shoulders to see what tests we’ve ordered – it’s the insurance companies that require pre-authorization and proof that less expensive therapies have already been tried. Being an advocate for our patients, and taking the extra time to make sure appropriate testing is obtained, generally amounts to more uncompensated paperwork. Bullying your way through simply does not work for real doctors.

Aside from his diagnostic skills, Dr. House is the antithesis of a good physician. But still he’s funny, and now and then I learn a thing or two. Once or twice a season I solve the case before the esteemed Dr. House – which keeps me coming back for more. The cases are true, by the way, all oddballs that the average doctor might see once in a lifetime. In medical school we’re taught that when you hear hoofbeats, you should think horses, not zebras. But in Dr. House’s case, he’s got a stableful of zebras.

Copyright 2010 Cynthia J. Koelker, M.D.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Home Based Business Millionaires, Part I (Santa Letters Millionaire)

Byron Reese Story

Byron Reese Started his company, SantaMail.org, which sells fully personalized letters from Santa Claus all across North America (they’re even postmarked from North Pole, Alaska, to give them an authentic feeling). Reese sold 10,000 letters in 2001, his first year in business. Though holiday sales have increased every subsequent year, he still looked for ways to expand his offering. Now, parents can order birthday cards for their children from Santa as well. The strategy pushed 2005 sales to $1 million.

Still, the key to Reese’s success is organization. After realizing he and his staff didn’t want to pull the marathon 36-hour shifts they did the first year, he looked to outside vendors to help with the yearly rush. He also deals with any problems as soon as the rush is over, and then starts planning for the next year. By February, he’s up and running. “The temptation is to not start working until you get close to that season, and we’ve made that mistake in the past,” says Reese, 37. “Things always take a lot longer than you think they’re going to take. We find it much better to work steadily.”

“When I was a child, my parents would give us letters from Santa. My mom died three and a half years ago, and I wanted to do this to honor her,” says Byron. “I entered it with low expectations, but we sold 10,000 the first year.” The magic of Christmas is a serious trust to Byron, so he implemented a rigorous quality-control program that has multiple people (his elves) checking each letter, ensuring complete accuracy on each one, as well as on a birthday card from Santa and the post-Christmas ‘Greetings from Hawaii’ postcard from a tanned, beach-bound Santa.

Byron’s childhood Christmas memories include installing 200 strings of Christmas lights and decorating dozens of Christmas cookies each year. He loves the look on the postman’s face when he goes to buy 40,000 Santa stamps at the post office each Christmas. What’s next on this Christmas devotee’s agenda?

“Someday I hope to deliver coolers of snow to people in hot climates.”

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Learn How to Install Metal Roofing

Learning how to install metal roofing may be your first step toward safeguarding your home from the elements in the most efficient and economical way. Although the initial monetary outlay may seem high, if you remain in the home for a period of years, the cost justifies itself. Experts agree that a home with a metal roofing system withstands greater wear and tear than other types of roofing.

Several metal shingle suppliers online offer advice and instructions on how to install metal roofing. One of these, Permanent Roofing Systems (www.PermanentRoofing.com) offers a downloadable PDF file to those interesting in learning how to install metal roofing purchased from their company.

The patent-pending, do-it-yourself metal roofing offered by Permanent Roofing features a four-way interlocking system of aluminum shingles. The user-friendly design of the Permanent Roofing system gives people who are trying to learn how to install metal roofing a leg up with its innovative system.

Because so many types of metal roofing exist, before you decide on learning how to install metal roofing, you might want to check some of these out. Some of the most popular metal roofing systems being used today include Gerard, Decrabond, Met-Tile, Prestige, and Zappone. Prices for metal roofing with these systems vary anywhere from $1.25 to $4.50 per square foot in material ranging from aluminum to copper.

If you feel better about learning how to install metal roofing from reading a book, check out Roofing the Right Way by Steven Bolt. You can find Bolt’s book, which includes a fairly comprehensive section on metal roofing, at Amazon.com for around $20, not including shipping.

Learning how to install metal roofing doesn’t have to be a daunting task when done methodically. Reading Permanent Roofing Systems’ instructions, educating yourself on the various types of metal roofing systems, and acquiring Steven Bolt’s book should all propel you forward in your quest of how to install metal roofing.

So don’t put off your quest on how to install metal roofing any longer! There’s no time like the present to get started on the roof you’ve dreamed about forever. And learning how to install metal roofing may lead to learning something else. Who knows? You could start a habit you’ll never want to break!

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment